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Falmouth (Hotels in Falmouth Click Here)
Falmouth Harbour and Carrick Roads form one of the finest natural havens in the world, and the third largest after Sydney and Rio. The estuary with all its many creeks covers a total shoreline of nearly 70 miles. Falmouth attracts boat-lovers of all kinds. Until the late 16th century, Falmouth was little more than a fishing hamlet known as Smithick or Pennycomequick. The development of Falmouth was orchestrated by the Killigrew family, and its success was ensured by being chosen, in 1688, as a packet station for the Post Office. For 160 years, Falmouth’s packet ships delivered mail to Spain, Portugal, the West Indies, North America and Brazil. Ancillary trades attracted by the packet business, particularly ship repair, enabled the port to survive and grow after it lost the contract in 1851. Falmouth Docks, founded in 1860, today handles ships of up to 90,000 tonnes and has a worldwide reputation for yacht-building. The town has plenty of pubs and restaurants, with beaches and hotels to the south on Falmouth Bay. The National Maritime Museum Cornwall is well worth a visit. A core of working core boats still dredges the oyster beds in the northern part of Carrick Roads and is the last working sailing fleet in Western Europe.

Blue Haze Guest House - Falmouth - 01326 313132
Boswyn - Falmouth - 01326 314667
Budock Vean Golf & Country House Hotel - Falmouth - 01326 252100
Chelsea House Hotel - Falmouth - 01326 212230
Dolvean Hotel - Falmouth - 01326 313658
Esmond House - Falmouth - 01326 313214
Four Seasons - Falmouth - 01326 311465
Grove Hotel - Falmouth - 01326 319577
Gyllyngvase House Hotel - Falmouth - 01326 312956
Lyonesse Guest House - Falmouth - 01326 313017
Maenheere Hotel - Falmouth - 01326 312009
Palm Court Hotel (Falmouth) Ltd - Falmouth - 01326 313076
Penpol Guest House - Falmouth - 01326 312587
Rosemullion Hotel - Falmouth - 01326 314690
The Oasis Guest House - Falmouth - 01326 311457
Trevoil Guest House - Falmouth - 01326 314145
Waverley Guest House - Falmouth - 01326 313766

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Flushing
Facing Falmouth across the Penryn River, Flushing is a handsome village and still almost entirely unspoilt. In the 17th century, local landowner Francis Trefusis transformed the hamlet of Nankersey into the flourishing little town of Flushing with the help of engineers from Flessinghe in Holland (hence the name) who supervised the draining of low-lying marshland and the building of the fine dry-stone sea walls and quays. With the coming of the packet service to Falmouth, Flushing became the chosen home of packet captains and naval officers; a place of high fashion and gentility where, we are told by James Silk Buckingham who was born here in 1786, ‘ dinners, balls and evening parties were held at some one or other of the Captain’s houses every evening’.

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Fowey (Hotels in Fowey Click Here)
The mouth of the Fowey River, with the town of Fowey on one side of the deep-water estuary and the village of Polruan on the other, is breathtakingly beautiful. Even the modern developments on the skyline above old Polruan cannot mar the glory of the scene. Fowey was one of the foremost ports of mediaeval England, famed for its piratical seamen and its shipbuilding, and it is still a busy harbour today. Yachts and dinghies crowd the estuary in the summer and from the docks, which lie upriver, more than one million tonnes of china clay are exported each year making Fowey the 11th busiest port in the country. To see something of the beauty of the river, it is well worth taking a boat trip on the high tide from Town Quay up past the docks to Golant, or beyond as far as Lerryn. Fowey was the home town of Daphne du Maurier – she lived first at Ferryside in Bodinnick on the other side of the river then at Menabilly a mile or so to the west. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, known as ‘Q’, was a great Cornishman from Fowey and his memorial overlooks the harbour on Penleath Point between the main river and the creek called Pont Pill. Should you find your way to this monument by foot, across the Bodinnick ferry and up the hill, taking the footpath on the right signed to Polruan, you will have discovered perhaps the greatest historic walk in Cornwall.

Anlynton Bed & Breakfast - Fowey - 01726 833818
Carnethick House Hotel - Fowey - 01726 833336
Fowey Hall Hotel - Fowey - 01726 833866
King of Prussia Hotel - Fowey - 01726 832450
Marina Hotel - Fowey - 01726 833315
Old Ferry Inn - Fowey - 01726 870237
Pendower B & B - Fowey - 01726 833559
Polscoe Guest House - Fowey - 01726 832407
Quayside Guest House - Fowey - 01726 870377
Terracotta House - Fowey - 01726 834 925
The Cormorant on the River - Fowey - 01726 833426
The Ship Inn - Fowey - 01726 832230
Trevanion Guest House - Fowey - 01726 832602

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Gerrans Bay
Lying between St. Anthony Head to the west and Nare Head to the east, this gentle bay backed by the lush farmland of the Roseland peninsula, provides several good beaches and some excellent walks. Local tradition relates that King Gerent (or Gerrenius) of Cornwall was buried in Carne Beacon, a huge Bronze Age barrow inland from Carne Beach, in about AD590. His body was supposedly carried across Gerrans Bay from Dingerein Castle, an earthwork above Treluggan Cliff, in a golden boat rowed with silver oars which were interred with his body. An excavation of the barrow in 1855 failed to corroborate this story, but a stone burial chest was found to contain ashes and charcoal.

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Godrevy
Just off the coast at Godrevy Head, the lighthouse on Godrevy Island was built in 1859 in response to a public outcry over the number of lives lost in ships wrecked on a submerged reef just beyond the island. The light is no longer manned, but the garden plots of the three keepers who used to live there can still be seen from the mainland. Virginia Woolf’s novel To the Lighthouse was partly inspired by her lengthy childhood holidays spent in St. Ives, with the view of Godrevy Lighthouse across the bay: ‘For the great plateful of blue water was before her; the hoary lighthouse, distant, austere, in the midst; and on the right, as far as the eye could see, fading and falling, in soft low pleats, the green sand dunes with the wild flowing grasses on them...’.

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Click here for Cornish Towns, here for Myths and Legends and here for Cornish History.

Coming soon, the Cornish Accommodation Directory......

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