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Torpoint (Hotels in Torpoint Click Here)
Torpoint began as a small hamlet with a slate walled wharf at the ferry point for Devonport during the early part of the 18th century. Expansion of the dockyard and creation of the Liskeard Turnpike both ensured that Torpoint grew to become a flourishing town, matching the growth of Plymouth. Many of the town's older and more notable buildings and its street layout date from periods of planned growth in the early 19th century.

Cliff House - Torpoint - 01752 823110
Copley Arms - Torpoint - 01503 240209
Finnygook Inn - Torpoint - 01503 230338
Halfway House - Torpoint - 01503 230202
Halfway House Inn - Torpoint - 01752 822279
Harbour View - Torpoint - 01752 814705
Inn on the Shore - Torpoint - 01503 250210
J.L Wilton - Torpoint - 01752 822215
K Ridpath - Torpoint - 01752 822626
Sheviock Barton B & B - Torpoint - 01503 230793
St. James Guest House - Torpoint - 01752 812612
The Friary Manor Hotel & Restaurant - Torpoint - 01752 822112
The Liscawn Inn - Torpoint - 01503 230863
The Old Mill House - Torpoint - 01503 230596
Whitsand Bay Hotel - Torpoint - 01503 230276
Wringford Down Hotel - Torpoint - 01752 822287

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Tregony
This fine looking village, with its broad main street curving down towards the bridge over the Fal, was a busy mediaeval port despite being so far inland. The Fal has suffered particularly badly from silting – it was once navigable even further upstream than Tregony – but the tide began to recede from here in the 15th century, taking with it all river-borne trade and Tregony’s link to the open sea. During its heyday it is said that there were 36 alehouses here, of various descriptions. Now there is just one.

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Tresillian
The quays at Tresillian have long since lost their busy river traffic and have recently been built over with outsized car showrooms: the final, ironic victory of road transport over water. The bridge at the head of the creek is modern, but there has been a bridge here for centuries and it had its moment of fame on March 10th 1646 when it was chosen for a meeting between the broken Royalist army, under Lord Hopton at Truro, and the victorious Roundheads, under General Fairfax at Tregony. The treaty which was subsequently signed signalled the end of the Civil War in the west.

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Truro (Hotels in Truro Click Here)
It would be hard to imagine a finer capital for Cornwall than this small, beautifully-proportioned city with a long history as a port on the confluence of the rivers Allen and Kenwyn, as a coinage town for the tin industry, as a market town serving a large rural area and as a place of Georgian culture and elegance. Remnants of the old port area where the fresh waters of the Allen and Kenwyn meet the salt of the Fal estuary can still be seen – not all of the quays have been built over with car parks and superstores yet – and there are good warehouses on the river, some of them reused by small businesses. The cathedral, rising magnificently out of the crowded city centre, was built between 1880 and 1910, the first Anglican cathedral to be constructed in England since St Paul’s. The new building, designed by J.L. Pearson, incorporated one sixteenth-century aisle from the old parish church of St Mary’s which had occupied this spot for six hundred years. Inside, look out for the wonderful painting Cornubia – Land of the Saints by the renowned Penwith artist John Miller. The excellent Royal Cornwall Museum in River Street contains extensive collections of Cornish paintings, minerals, mining artefacts and archaeological finds. Lemon Street is, in Pevnser’s opinion, ‘one of the most completely Georgian streets preserved anywhere’. At its upper end is the Lander Monument to the Truro brothers who explored Africa; the figure of Richard Lander on top of the column was sculpted by the celebrated Neville Northey Burnard from Altarnun. The granite City Hall on Boscawen Street was built in 1846 in the Italian Renaissance style; following extensive interior remodelling it is set to become a Hall for Cornwall offering unrivalled facilities for theatre, concerts, conferences and markets in the heart of Truro.

Alverton Manor Hotel - Truro - 01872 276633
B & B Fieldings - Truro - 01872 262783
BA & BA Trenerry Farm - Truro - 01872 553755
Bay Tree Guest House - Truro - 01872 240274
Braganza - Truro - 01326 270281
Briars - Truro - 01872 223814
Brookdale Hotel - Truro - 01872 273513
City Inn - Truro - 01872 272623
Cliftons - Truro - 01872 274116
Drift Wood Hotel - Truro - 01872 580644
Elerkey Guest House - Truro - 01872 501261
Gwel-Tek Lodge - Truro - 01872 276843
Manor Cottage - Truro - 01872 520212
N.A & J.A Dymond - Truro - 01872 279514
Palm Tree Guest House - Truro - 01872 270100
Patmos Guest House - Truro - 01872 278018
Pendower Beach House Hotel - Truro - 01872 501241
Perran House - Truro - 01726 882066
Rose Cottage - Truro - 01872 501128
Roselin - Truro - 01872 862309
Rosevine Hotel - Truro - 01872 580206
Roundhouse Barn Cottages - Truro - 01872 580087
Royal Hotel - Truro - 01872 270345
September Lodge - Truro - 01872 572206
St. Mawes Hotel - Truro - 01326 270266
The Beach Hotel - Truro - 01209 890228
The Carlton Hotel - Truro - 01872 272450
The Gables - Truro - 01872 242318
The Hundred House Hotel - Truro - 01872 501336
The Nare Hotel - Truro - 01872 501111
The Ship & Castle Hotel - Truro - 01326 270401
The Victoria Inn - Truro - 01872 278313
Tregongon House - Truro - 01872 501708
Treverbyn House - Truro - 01872 501201
Trewithian Farm B & B - Truro - 01872 580293
Ventongimps Mill Barn - Truro - 01872 573275
W H Michell - Truro - 01326 270731
Woodbury Guest House - Truro - 01872 271466

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Veryan
The large church of St Symphorian is set in one of the loveliest of Cornish churchtowns: pub, shop and school amongst the lush trees and gardens. Veryan’s famous round houses were commissioned in the early nineteenth century by the Rev. Jeremiah Trist, to a design by the builder Hugh Rowe of Lostwithiel. Tradition has it that they were to protect the village from evil; they have no corners so there is nowhere for the devil to hide, and each has a crucifix on the summit of its thatched roof as an added deterrent. Nare Head to the south is a fine place for walking, with Gull Rock just offshore a notable seabird colony.

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Wadebridge (Hotels in Wadebridge Click Here)
A pleasant shopping-town with a recently pedestrianised main street and a history as a busy river port, the glory of Wadebridge is still, as it has always been, its great bridge across the Camel. There are new bridges on either side of it today, one a footbridge, the other carrying the A39, but this is the bridge and it has been described as one of the best mediaeval bridges in England, despite the widening and strengthening works in 1847 and again in 1963 which have changed its character somewhat. It was built in the 1460s on the site of an important but dangerous ford (the town was then simply called Wade, from the English waed meaning ‘ford’) which had a chapel at either end to greet the valiant travellers. The account of the building of the bridge written by John Leland in 1538 still stands as a classic: ‘Wher as now Wadebridge is, there was a Fery a 80 Yeres syns, and Menne sumtyme passing over by Horse stoode often in great Jeopardie. Then one Lovebone, Vicar of Wadebridge, movid with pitie began the Bridge, and with great Paine and Studie, good People putting their Help thereto, finished it with xvij fair and great uniforme Arches of Stone. One told me that the Fundation of certein of th’arches was first sette on so quik sandy Ground that Lovebone almost despairid to performe the Bridg ontyl such tyme as he layed Pakkes of Wolle for Fundation.’
This tradition, of the bridge having been built on wool, is found attached to other bridges and has no evidence to support it. The old railway from Wadebridge to Padstow, and in the other direction to Bodmin, is now the Camel Trail, popular with cyclists and walkers.

Atlantic House Hotel - Wadebridge - 01208 862208
Bedruthan House Hotel - Wadebridge - 01637 860346
Cant Farm - Wadebridge - 01208 862841
Fourways Inn - Wadebridge - 01208 862384
Gleneglos Hotel - Wadebridge - 01208 862369
Hustyns - Wadebridge - 01208 893700
Molesworth Arms Hotel - Wadebridge - 01208 812055
Molesworth Manor - Wadebridge - 01841 540292
Roskarnon House Hotel - Wadebridge - 01208 862785
Silvermead Guest House - Wadebridge - 01208 862425
St Enodoc Hotel - Wadebridge - 01208 863394
The Halfway House - Wadebridge - 01208 812524
The Old Mill Country House - Wadebridge - 01841 540388
Tzitzikama Lodge - Wadebridge - 01208 862839

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Zennor
The village of Zennor is a granite huddle set in the extraordinary landscape of Penwith’s north coast, where a narrow coastal shelf between the rugged cliffs and the swelling line of old moorland hills inland (the ‘carns’) is patterned with a tracery of prehistoric stone-hedged field systems and isolated farmsteads. This feels like a very old place indeed; there has been human settlement in the Zennor area since the early Bronze Age and the echoes of these ancient times are still remarkably strong. As Betjeman put it: ‘Nature and prehistory in this treeless parish strewn with granite boulders among the heather make the efforts of modern man, even five hundred years ago, seem small and futile’. In the church of St Senara is the famous fifteenth-century bench end depicting the Mermaid of Zennor, whose beauty and bewitching singing is said to have lured Matthew Trewhella, a sweet-voiced chorister, to her watery lair in Pendour Cove. Amongst its many literary associations, Zennor is perhaps best known for the year and a half that D.H. Lawrence and his wife Frieda lived here during the Great War – first at the Tinner’s Arms in the village and then in a group of cottages at Higher Tregerthen – before being ejected under suspicion of spying for the enemy (Frieda was German-born and they did have an unfortunate penchant for singing German folk songs...). Zennor makes fleeting appearances in some of Lawrence’s writing, notably in Kangaroo, where he describes ‘seeing the light swim above the sea, [Somers] felt he was over the border in another world. Over the border, in that twilight, awesome world of the previous Celts’.

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Click here for Cornish Towns, here for Myths and Legends and here for Cornish History.

Coming soon, the Cornish Accommodation Directory......

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